Posts Tagged Security

Wikibon’s Big Data Research Agenda: Technology, Ecosystem and Application

Screen Shot 2014-01-02 at 1.51.45 PMI’ve already laid out my predictions for Big Data in 2014, but I also wanted to let the Wikibon community know how my colleagues and I plan to cover Big Data in the year ahead. We’ve organized our research agenda into three major buckets.

Technology. Clearly the technologies and products that collectively make up Big Data – including Hadoop, NoSQL data stores, analytic databases, data visualization tools and more – are maturing at a rapid pace (much faster, for example, than relational databases did in the 1980s.) Big Data is also applicable across industries,  meaning these technologies are inevitably and increasingly intersecting with adjacent technology movements, namely the cloud, mobile computing and social media. As we have for the last several years, Wikibon will devote significant coverage to these developments with an eye on putting technology innovations in context for enterprise Big Data practitioners (both technology practitioners and line-of-business practitioners.)

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Unhackable Encryption

It’s not news that quantum mechanics can be used to send secret messages without concern of them being intercepted.  For years, physicists have been using this technology to do so.  However, a true quantum link has only recently been successful.  Originally, the messages were sent using quantum mechanics, but then had to be decoded at each node in order to continue the message.  Since the nodes weren’t quantum mechanical, this left the information vulnerable to hacking at each node.  A quantum link means the message never has to be decoded.  By combining many quantum links, a true quantum network could be created.  This would mean a completely unhackable telecommunications network.

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7 Most Devastating Hacks (and how to prevent them)

Hackers are coming up with more and more ways to gain control over information on the internet. There are dozens of reasons for hackers to do what they do, but here is a list of how they do it, and how to prevent them.

1. Cross site scripting (XSS)

The most commonly exploited security vulnerability in web applications. The weakness arises when an application does not validate or encode user data before the information is sent to a web browser. Hackers implement malicious script in a browser and gain access to user sessions, web sites, conduct phishing, and/or release malware.

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Polymorphic Malware trends on the rise

The use of Polymorphic Malware by cyber criminals is on the rise. A recently cited report from Symantec regarding this trend stems from some of these exploding statistics.  Malware of this type is known as polymorphic because it is described to constantly change in nature, making the detection and removal of infections a very difficult task. The code in such polymorphic malware retains its function through its evolution, but the code itself is known to change various characteristics and methods such as changing filenames, encryption, compression techniques, signature changes, among others.

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8 Levels of Information Technology Security

In a world of viruses, malware, and hackers, information security is a big deal. One single method of IT security cannot insure protection of mission-critical data. In the enterprise IT environment, layering multiple tactics and security processes can help close all of the gaps. A visual look at a data center provides us with the 8 levels of information technology security which work together to form a tight-knit and (hopefully) impenetrable web of safeness.

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The Dark Side of Security…by Art Coviello

Could the Bad Guys Collapse the Internet?

Could the Bad Guys Collapse the Internet?

Every time I talk to Art Coviello, President of RSA, I get depressed, scared and hopeful. I received a memo today from RSA which was Art’s yearend review and 2010 look ahead. Here are some excerpts.

From the Desk of Art Coviello

Subject:  Security in 2009 and a look ahead

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